Allen
LeBlanc
  • MDRC Publications

      Telephone Care Management for Medicaid Recipients with Depression, Thirty-Six Months After Random Assignment

      December, 2011
      Sue Kim, Allen J. LeBlanc, Pamela Morris, Greg Simon, Johanna Walter

      A telephonic care management program increased the use of mental health services by Medicaid recipients with depression while the program was running, but it did not help individuals sustain treatment after the intervention ended. The program did not reduce depression on average, nor did it have any effect on employment outcomes.

      Telephone Care Management for Medicaid Recipients with Depression, Eighteen Months After Random Assignment

      November, 2010
      Sue Kim, Allen J. LeBlanc, Pamela Morris, Greg Simon, Johanna Walter

      A telephonic care management program increased the use of mental health services by Medicaid recipients with depression, although that effect faded over time. The program did not reduce depression on average, but it did reduce the number of people who suffered from very severe depression.

      Early Results from a Telephone Care Management Program for Medicaid Recipients with Depression

      August, 2009
      Sue Kim, Allen J. LeBlanc, Charles Michalopoulos

      Very early results from a random assignment study suggest that Working toward Wellness increased the use of mental health services and had mixed effects on depression severity. Impacts are concentrated among Hispanic participants.

      Effects of a Performance-Based Scholarship Program for Low-Income Parents

      January, 2009
      Lashawn Richburg-Hayes, Thomas Brock, Allen J. LeBlanc, Christina Paxson, Cecilia Elena Rouse, Lisa Barrow

      This report describes the impacts of a performance-based scholarship program with a counseling component on academic success and persistence among low-income parents. Students who participated in the program, which was operated at two New Orleans-area colleges as part of MDRC’s multisite Opening Doors demonstration, were more likely to stay in school, get higher grades, and earn more credits.

      Two-Year Effects of a Freshmen Learning Community Program at Kingsborough Community College

      March, 2008
      Susan Scrivener, Dan Bloom, Allen J. LeBlanc, Christina Paxson, Cecilia Elena Rouse, Colleen Sommo

      Freshmen in a “learning community” at Kingsborough Community College in Brooklyn, NY, moved more quickly through developmental English requirements, took and passed more courses, and earned more credits in their first semester than students in a control group. Two years later, they were also somewhat more likely to be enrolled in college.

      The Opening Doors Demonstration

      June, 2005
      Thomas Brock, Allen J. LeBlanc

      The Opening Doors Demonstration is designed to show how community colleges can help more low-income students remain in school and improve other outcomes, including degree attainment, labor market success, and personal and social well-being.

  • Other Publications

  • Projects