Caitlin
Anzelone
Deputy Director, Center for Applied Behavioral Science

Anzelone works in the Center for Applied Behavioral Science, where she leads several behavioral science studies in postsecondary and government settings. She specializes in innovative behavioral design that can be replicated on any scale, organizational change, operational challenges when implementing experiments in real-world contexts, and training in behavioral science. She is currently the director of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency Capstone, Encouraging Additional Summer Enrollment (EASE), and Finish Line: Graduation by Design projects. She holds an MA in social-organizational psychology from Columbia University and BS in psychology with a minor in communications and media studies from Fordham University.

  • MDRC Publications

      Brief

      Using Behavioral Science to Encourage Postsecondary Summer Enrollment

      July, 2018

      Community college students who enroll in summer courses are more likely to graduate, but most do not attend during the summer. The Encouraging Additional Summer Enrollment (EASE) project uses insights from behavioral science to encourage more students to enroll in summer. This brief presents EASE’s Phase I findings.

      Report
      March, 2018
      Caitlin Anzelone, Nadine Dechausay, Xavier Alemany

      This compendium of written materials comes from the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project. The collection illustrates how specific concepts from behavioral science were used in different settings and formats by practitioners and program designers in child care, child support, and work-support programs.

      Brief

      Behavioral Strategies to Increase Engagement in Child Support

      February, 2018

      An essential step in the child support process is delivering legal documents to the person named as a parent. This intervention in Georgia applied insights from behavioral science to get more parents to come in and accept documents voluntarily instead of using a sheriff or process server to deliver them.

      Report

      Final Report of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) Project

      May, 2017
      Lashawn Richburg-Hayes, Caitlin Anzelone, Nadine Dechausay

      The BIAS project tested behavioral interventions in child support, child care, and work support programs with nearly 100,000 low-income clients in eight human services agencies. Each site saw at least one significant, low-cost impact. The findings suggest that small environmental changes can enhance client-agency interactions and expanded behavioral strategies might help strengthen programs and policies.

      Report

      Using Behavioral Science to Improve Indiana’s Child Care Subsidy Program

      September, 2016
      Nadine Dechausay, Caitlin Anzelone

      Three behavioral interventions targeting low-income parents receiving child care subsidies were tested in Indiana. One combining mailed materials and a phone call increased the percentage of parents who chose a highly rated child care provider, and two others increased the percentage of parents who attended their first scheduled subsidy redetermination appointment.

      Report

      Using Behavioral Insights to Encourage People to Participate

      August, 2015
      Nadine Dechausay, Caitlin Anzelone, Leigh Reardon

      Several low-cost behavioral messaging interventions boosted participant attendance at an optional informational meeting for Paycheck Plus, an earnings supplement program in New York City. This test is part of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project, sponsored by the federal Administration for Children and Families.

      Report

      Using Behavioral Economics to Help Incarcerated Parents Apply for Child Support Order Modifications

      September, 2014
      Mary Farrell, Caitlin Anzelone, Dan Cullinan, Jessica Wille

      A low-cost behavioral intervention increased by 11 percentage points the proportion of incarcerated noncustodial parents in Texas who applied for modifications to reduce the amount of their child support orders. This test is part of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project, sponsored by the federal Administration for Children and Families.

      Report

      Designing Innovative Solutions for Programs Supported by the Administration for Children and Families

      April, 2014
      Lashawn Richburg-Hayes, Caitlin Anzelone, Nadine Dechausay, Saugato Datta, Alexandra Fiorillo, Louis Potok, Matthew Darling, John Balz

      This report describes three sites in the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project, which applies tools from behavioral economics to improve the well-being of low-income individuals and families — the Texas Office of the Attorney General’s Child Support Division, the Illinois Department of Human Services, and the National Domestic Violence Hotline.

      Report

      A Technical Supplement to “Behavioral Economics and Social Policy”

      April, 2014
      Lashawn Richburg-Hayes, Caitlin Anzelone, Nadine Dechausay, Saugato Datta, Alexandra Fiorillo, Louis Potok, Matthew Darling, John Balz

      This technical supplement to an introductory report for the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project presents a description of behavioral interventions that have been commonly researched in studies.

  • Other Publications

  • Projects