Nadine
Dechausay
  • MDRC Publications

      March, 2018
      Caitlin Anzelone, Nadine Dechausay, Xavier Alemany

      This compendium of written materials comes from the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project. The collection illustrates how specific concepts from behavioral science were used in different settings and formats by practitioners and program designers in child care, child support, and work-support programs.

      Lessons from the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Pilot Project

      January, 2018
      Nadine Dechausay

      Executive skills are the cognitive abilities that make it possible for people to set goals, regulate impulses, and complete the steps necessary to achieve their objectives. This paper describes a pilot of a coaching strategy based on executive skills conducted with three programs serving young people.

      Final Report of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) Project

      May, 2017
      Lashawn Richburg-Hayes, Caitlin Anzelone, Nadine Dechausay

      The BIAS project tested behavioral interventions in child support, child care, and work support programs with nearly 100,000 low-income clients in eight human services agencies. Each site saw at least one significant, low-cost impact. The findings suggest that small environmental changes can enhance client-agency interactions and expanded behavioral strategies might help strengthen programs and policies.

      Findings from Family Rewards 2.0

      September, 2016
      Cynthia Miller, Rhiannon Miller, Nandita Verma, Nadine Dechausay, Edith Yang, Timothy Rudd, Jonathan Rodriguez, Sylvie Honig

      A program in Memphis and the Bronx offered cash incentives, coupled with family guidance, to poor families for meeting certain health care, education, and work milestones. The program increased income and reduced poverty, increased dental visits and health status, reduced employment somewhat, and had few effects on students’ education.

      Using Behavioral Science to Improve Indiana’s Child Care Subsidy Program

      September, 2016
      Nadine Dechausay, Caitlin Anzelone

      Three behavioral interventions targeting low-income parents receiving child care subsidies were tested in Indiana. One combining mailed materials and a phone call increased the percentage of parents who chose a highly rated child care provider, and two others increased the percentage of parents who attended their first scheduled subsidy redetermination appointment.

      Using Behavioral Insights to Encourage People to Participate

      August, 2015
      Nadine Dechausay, Caitlin Anzelone, Leigh Reardon

      Several low-cost behavioral messaging interventions boosted participant attendance at an optional informational meeting for Paycheck Plus, an earnings supplement program in New York City. This test is part of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project, sponsored by the federal Administration for Children and Families.

      Early Lessons from Family Rewards 2.0

      October, 2014

      This project builds on NYC’s earlier experiment with a conditional cash transfer program to reduce poverty and improve education, health, and employment outcomes. It tests a revised model in the Bronx and Memphis, adding family guidance to modified incentives paid more frequently. Early implementation findings suggest deeper family engagement.

      A Technical Supplement to “Behavioral Economics and Social Policy”

      April, 2014
      Lashawn Richburg-Hayes, Caitlin Anzelone, Nadine Dechausay, Saugato Datta, Alexandra Fiorillo, Louis Potok, Matthew Darling, John Balz

      This technical supplement to an introductory report for the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project presents a description of behavioral interventions that have been commonly researched in studies.

      Designing Innovative Solutions for Programs Supported by the Administration for Children and Families

      April, 2014
      Lashawn Richburg-Hayes, Caitlin Anzelone, Nadine Dechausay, Saugato Datta, Alexandra Fiorillo, Louis Potok, Matthew Darling, John Balz

      This report describes three sites in the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project, which applies tools from behavioral economics to improve the well-being of low-income individuals and families — the Texas Office of the Attorney General’s Child Support Division, the Illinois Department of Human Services, and the National Domestic Violence Hotline.

      The Continuing Story of the Opportunity NYC−Family Rewards Demonstration

      September, 2013
      James A. Riccio, Nadine Dechausay, Cynthia Miller, Stephen Nuñez, Nandita Verma, Edith Yang

      Family Rewards, a three-year demonstration, provided cash payments to low-income families in New York City for achieving specific health, education, and employment goals. New results show that the program substantially reduced poverty and material hardship while it operated and had positive results in improving some education, health, and work-related outcomes.

      How Families Responded to Education Incentives in New York City’s Conditional Cash Transfer Program

      May, 2011
      David M. Greenberg, Nadine Dechausay, Carolyn Fraker

      Opportunity NYC-Family Rewards was a conditional cash transfer program that provided payments to low-income families for achieving specific health, education, and employment goals. Drawing on in-depth interviews, this report looks at how families viewed the education incentives, communicated about them with their children, reinforced educational rewards, and advanced their quality of life through the program.

      Early Findings from New York City’s Conditional Cash Transfer Program

      March, 2010
      James A. Riccio, Nadine Dechausay, David M. Greenberg, Cynthia Miller, Zawadi Rucks, Nandita Verma

      Targeted toward low-income families in six high-poverty New York City communities, Opportunity NYC-Family Rewards offers cash payments tied to efforts and achievements in children’s education, family preventive health care practices, and parents’ employment. In its first two years, the program substantially reduced poverty and material hardship and had positive results in improving some education, health-related, and work-related outcomes.

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