Timothy
Rudd
  • MDRC Publications

      Findings from Family Rewards 2.0

      September, 2016
      Cynthia Miller, Rhiannon Miller, Nandita Verma, Nadine Dechausay, Edith Yang, Timothy Rudd, Jonathan Rodriguez, Sylvie Honig

      A program in Memphis and the Bronx offered cash incentives, coupled with family guidance, to poor families for meeting certain health care, education, and work milestones. The program increased income and reduced poverty, increased dental visits and health status, reduced employment somewhat, and had few effects on students’ education.

      A Conditional Cash Transfer Program in Two American Cities

      September, 2016
      Timothy Rudd, Jonathan Rodriguez, David H. Greenberg

      This program spent a little over a dollar to transfer one dollar in cash rewards to families who met the required benchmarks. These rewards produced positive effects on some outcomes, but left others unchanged. While the program benefited participating families, the cost to taxpayers exceeded the economic value of these effects.

      Final Report on the Performance-Based Scholarship Demonstration

      November, 2015
      Alexander Mayer, Reshma Patel, Timothy Rudd, Alyssa Ratledge

      Performance-based scholarships are designed to give students more money for college and to provide incentives for academic progress. This report analyzes data from rigorous evaluations of six different programs, in six states, with more than 12,000 students. The scholarship programs improved academic progress, including modest effects on degree completion.

      Interim Findings from the Performance-Based Scholarship Demonstration in California

      June, 2015
      Lashawn Richburg-Hayes, Reshma Patel, Thomas Brock, Elijah de la Campa, Timothy Rudd, Ireri Valenzuela

      This report presents early findings from a random assignment evaluation of performance-based scholarships targeting college-bound high school seniors in California. The scholarships were completely portable, meaning that a student could use them at any accredited, degree-granting college or university.

      Three-Year Effects of CUNY’s Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) for Developmental Education Students

      February, 2015

      The City University of New York’s comprehensive ASAP program nearly doubles the three-year graduation rate for developmental education students in community college – at a lower cost-per-degree than regular services. ASAP also increases rates of transfer to four-year colleges.

      Performance-Based Scholarships, Student Services, and Developmental Math at Hillsborough Community College

      October, 2014
      Colleen Sommo, Melissa Boynton, Herbert Collado, John Diamond, Alissa Gardenhire, Alyssa Ratledge, Timothy Rudd, Michael J. Weiss

      This program provides an incentive for developmental math students to take their math courses early and consecutively, get help in an on-campus Math Lab, and strive for passing grades or better, in exchange for a modest performance-based scholarship. Compared with standard services, the program's effects are modest but positive.

      Early Lessons from the New York City Social Impact Bond

      December, 2013
      Timothy Rudd, Elisa Nicoletti, Kristin Misner, Janae Bonsu

      A social impact bond (SIB) is an innovative way to fund promising new programs at no cost to taxpayers. This report describes the first operational SIB in the U.S., explaining how an intervention for youth incarcerated at Rikers Island was developed, how the unique financing mechanism was arranged, and how the program was adapted and implemented at full scale.

      Interim Findings from the PBS Demonstration

      August, 2013
      Reshma Patel, Lashawn Richburg-Hayes, Elijah de la Campa, Timothy Rudd

      Interim results suggest that performance-based scholarships improve students’ academic performance and increase the number of credits they earn. In some sites, the scholarships also appear to reduce student debt. In the one location for which data are available so far, the program increased the proportion of students earning a degree.

      Lessons from Two New York City Community Colleges

      November, 2012
      Reshma Patel, Timothy Rudd

      Can a scholarship without services improve academic progress? For adult developmental education students, this program encouraged more full-time enrollment during the semesters in which it operated and increased registration and credit accumulation in the summer semester, but it did not increase the average number of semesters registered or credits earned over two years.

      Six-Year Effects of a Freshman Learning Community Program at Kingsborough Community College

      July, 2012

      Students who participated in a one-semester learning community, in which small groups of student took three linked classes together and received other extra services, were more likely to have graduated six years later. The program also proved to be cost-effective.

      Final Results from the Evaluation of the Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) Transitional Jobs Program

      January, 2012
      Cindy Redcross, Megan Millenky, Timothy Rudd, Valerie Levshin

      Ex-prisoners who had access to CEO’s transitional jobs program were less likely to be convicted of a crime and reincarcerated. The effects were particularly large for those ex-prisoners who enrolled in the program shortly after release. The recidivism reductions mean that the program is cost-effective — generating more in savings than it cost.

      Four-Year Findings from Chaffey College’s Opening Doors Program

      November, 2011
      Michael J. Weiss, Thomas Brock, Colleen Sommo, Timothy Rudd, Mary Clair Turner

      This program included a “College Success” course and offered enhanced counseling. A change from optional to required services led to increased program participation, and the new program decreased the percentage on academic probation after the two program semesters. Nevertheless, after four years, the program had no discernible effect on academic outcomes.

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