Available Public Use Files

   

Click on one of the links or scroll through the file summaries below to see which Public Use Files are currently available. The File ID number at the bottom of each file is required when you request a file.
 


 
   

MDRC Public Use Files and Restricted Use Files Available from MDRC

For information about these datasets see our FAQ page.  To request files from these datasets see our request page.

MDRC Public Use Files and Restricted Use Files available from the National Center for Education Evaluation, Institute of Education Sciences

For more information on how to obtain a restricted use data license, contact:

National Center for Education Statistics
Institute of Education Sciences
1990 K Street, NW
8th & 9th Floors
Washington, DC 20006, USA

TEL:
Restricted-use data license: (202) 502-7307, (202) 502-7363
General inquiries:  (202) 502-7300
EMAIL: http://nces.ed.gov/help/webmail/
WEBSITE: http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/licenses.asp

MDRC Public Use Files and Restricted Use Files available from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)

For further information on datasets, documentation, and procedures for accessing data contact:

National Center for Health Statistics
3311 Toledo Rd
Room 5419
Hyattsville, MD 20782-2064

TEL: (800) 232-4636
EMAILhttp://wwwn.cdc.gov/dcs/RequestForm.aspx
WEBSITE:  www.cdc.gov/nchs/

MDRC Public Use Files and Restricted Use Files available from the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR)

Most datasets are available in a variety of formats, including SAS, SPSS, STATA, ASCII, and delimited.

For further information on datasets, documentation, and procedures for accessing data contact:

ICPSR
University of Michigan
Institute for Social Research
P.O. Box 1248
Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1248

TEL: (734) 647-2200
EMAIL: [email protected]
WEBSITEwww.icpsr.umich.edu

 
   

 

 
   

Urban Change Client Survey Data from Four Counties

Two waves of survey data are available for all four counties in MDRC’s evaluation of the Project on Devolution and Urban Change, including Cuyahoga County (Cleveland), Ohio; Dade County (Miami), Florida; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Los Angeles, California. Files include one SAS data set. Data include five years of follow-up with single mothers between the ages of 18 and 45 who were receiving cash assistance and/or food stamps and living in neighborhoods where either the poverty rate exceeded 30 percent or the rate of welfare receipt exceeded 20 percent in May 1995. The survey covers topics such as service utilization, employment, family and household composition, household income, material hardship, health, domestic violence, and substance use. These data were used in Welfare Reform in Cleveland: Implementation, Effects, and Experiences of Poor Families and Neighborhoods (MDRC, 2002); Welfare Reform in Philadelphia: Implementation, Effects, and Experiences of Poor Families and Neighborhoods (MDRC, 2003); Welfare Reform in Miami: Implementation, Effects, and Experiences of Poor Families and Neighborhoods (MDRC, 2004); Welfare Reform in Los Angeles: Implementation, Effects, and Experiences of Poor Families and Neighborhoods (MDRC, 2005); and other Urban Change reports.
 

Format: SAS
Sample: 3,960
Vars: 2,745
File ID: UC0601


 

 

 

Urban Change Cleveland Client Survey Data

Two waves of longitudinal survey data are available from MDRC’s evaluation of welfare reform in Cuyahoga County (Cleveland), Ohio, as part of the four-city Project on Devolution and Urban Change. Files include one SAS data set. The survey data include five years of follow-up with single mothers between the ages of 18 and 45 who were receiving cash assistance and/or food stamps and living in neighborhoods where either the poverty rate exceeded 30 percent or the rate of welfare receipt exceeded 20 percent in May 1995. The intensive survey covers topics such as service utilization, employment, family and household composition, household income, material hardship, health, child outcomes, domestic violence, and substance use. These data were used in Welfare Reform in Cleveland: Implementation, Effects, and Experiences of Poor Families and Neighborhoods (MDRC, 2002) and other Urban Change reports.
 

Format: SAS
Sample: 867
Vars: 3,526
File ID: UC0301


 

 

 

Vermont’s Welfare Restructuring Project Analysis Data

Six years of administrative records data from UI earnings, food stamps, and AFDC/TANF; 42-month adult survey data; and 42-month child outcomes survey data are available from MDRC’s evaluation of Vermont’s Welfare Restructuring Project (WRP). Files include three SAS data sets. This evaluation included single and two-parent welfare applicants and recipients from six research districts chosen for intensive study (Barre, Burlington, Rutland, St. Albans, Newport, and Springfield). In addition to these data, demographic information is provided for each sample member. These data were used in WRP: Final Report on Vermont’s Welfare Restructuring Project (MDRC, 2002) as well as in other WRP reports.

Format: SAS
Sample: 7,691; 1,989; 3,741
Vars: 871; 363; 41
File ID: VT0201


 

 

 

Connecticut’s Jobs First Program Analysis Data

Four years of administrative records data from UI earnings, food stamps, and AFDC/TANF; 36-month adult survey data; and 36-month child outcomes survey data are available from MDRC’s evaluation of Connecticut’s Job First Program. Files include three SAS data sets. This evaluation included single parent welfare applicants and recipients from New Haven and Manchester. In addition to these data, demographic information is provided for each sample member. These data were used in Jobs First: Final Report on Connecticut’s Welfare Reform Initiative (MDRC, 2002) as well as in other Jobs First reports.
 

Format: SAS
Sample: 4,803; 2,424; 4,611
Vars: 1378; 571; 712
File ID: CT0201


 

 

 

Minnesota Family Investment Program (MFIP) Analysis Data

Three years of administrative records data from UI earnings, food stamps, and AFDC/MFIP; 36-month adult survey data; and 36-month child outcomes survey data are available from MDRC’s evaluation of the Minnesota Family Investment Program. Files include three SAS data sets. This evaluation included single-parent welfare applicants and recipients from seven counties in Minnesota. In addition to these data, baseline demographic information is provided for each sample member. These data were used in MFIP: Reforming Welfare and Rewarding Work: Final Report on the Minnesota Family Investment Program, Volumes 1 and 2 (MDRC, 2000).
 

Format: SAS
Sample: 14,170; 3,720; 1,929
Vars: 1,807; 564; 1,278
File ID: MF0201


 

 

 

Florida’s Family Transition Program (FTP) Analysis Data

Four years of administrative records data from UI earnings, food stamps, and AFDC/TANF; 48-month adult survey data; and 48-month child outcomes survey data are available from MDRC’s evaluation of Florida’s Family Transition Program. Files include three SAS data sets. This evaluation included single-parent welfare applicants and recipients from Escambia County. In addition to these data, demographic information is provided for each sample member. These data were used in FTP: Final Report on Florida’s Initial Time-Limited Welfare Program (MDRC, 2000) as well as in other FTP reports.
 

Format: SAS
Sample: 2,815; 1,729; 3,302
Vars: 1,132; 849; 679
File ID: FT0201


 

 

 

California’s GAIN Program: Three-Year Impacts Data from Six Counties

Three-year AFDC and earnings follow-up data are available from MDRCs evaluation of Californias JOBS initiative, GAIN. This evaluation included six of the states counties: Alameda, Butte, Los Angeles, Riverside, San Diego, and Tulare. Follow-up data, as well as demographic information, is provided for each sample member. The sample includes both AFDC single-parent and two-parent cases. These data were used in GAIN: Benefits, Costs, and Three-Year Impacts of a Welfare-to-Work Program (MDRC, 1994).

Format: SPSS
Sample: 32,933
Vars: 1,161
File ID: GN9401


 

 

 

Four Welfare Employment Studies from the 1980s

Two- to three-year AFDC and earnings (based on Unemployment Insurance records) follow-up data are available from four of MDRCs welfare employment studies conducted in the 1980s: Arkansas, Virginia, Maryland (Baltimore), and San Diego SWIM. In addition to these follow-up data, demographic information is provided for each sample member. These data were used in a paper assessing nonexperimental techniques for estimating the effects of employment and training programs, written by Daniel Friedlander and Phillip Robins.

Format: ASCII
Sample: 1,127; 3,150; 2,757; 3,211
Vars: 56; 59; 49; 49
File ID: WES1-4


 

 

 

Ohio’s Learning, Earning, and Parenting (LEAP) Analysis Data

Third- and fourth-year AFDC payment data and three to four years of school records follow-up data are available from MDRC’s analysis of Ohio’s Learning, Earning, and Parenting (LEAP) Program. This evaluation included 12 of the state’s counties: Cuyahoga, Franklin, Hamilton, Jefferson, Lawrence, Lorain, Lucas, Montgomery, Muskingum, Stark, Summit, and Trumbull. In addition to these follow-up data (which include LEAP bonus, sanction, and eligibility data), demographic information is provided for each sample member. These data were used in LEAP: Final Report on Ohio’s Welfare Initiative to Improve School Attendance Among Teenage Parents (MDRC, 1997) as well as in other LEAP reports.

Format: SAS
Sample: 7,682
Vars: 927
File ID: LP9701


 

 

 

New Chance Analysis Data

Forty-two months of follow-up data are available from MDRCs evaluation of New Chance, a comprehensive education, training, and parenting program for educationally disadvantaged teen parents. Demographic data, participation data, and economic and education outcome data were collected on over 2,000 young mothers in 16 sites around the country. These data were used in New Chance: Final Report on a Comprehensive Program for Young Mothers in Poverty and Their Children (MDRC, 1997).

Format: ASCII
Sample: 2,323
Vars: 1,803
File ID: NC9701


 

 

 

National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies (NEWWS)

Data files from the NEWWS evaluation are maintained by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

Click on the following link for information: http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/NEWWS/data-info.htm.


 

 

 

An Analysis of the Effects of an Academic Summer Program for Middle School Students, 2012 (ICPSR 36531)

An Analysis of the Effects of an Academic Summer Program for Middle School Students, 2012, funded by the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation’s Social Innovation Fund, was conducted in the Summer of 2012 in three school districts (District A, B, C) that were new partnerships for the Building Educated Leaders for Life program (BELL). Of the three study districts, District A and B offered the BELL program in one middle school each; District C offered the program in three schools.

Several types of quantitative data were collected about students and BELL teachers in the study. The nature and purpose of these data sources are described below.

(1) Spring (baseline) characteristics and test scores:During the application process, parents provided information about their child’s socioeconomic characteristics (racial or ethnic group, parents’ education, and so on. In addition, schools provided information about whether students in the study were eligible for free or reduced-price lunch, whether they had an individualized education plan (IEP), and whether English was their second language. Schools also provided students’ scores on the spring 2012 math and reading assessments administered by their state; these scores were used to determine whether students were proficient, based on local cutoff scores on their state test.

(2) Attendance records: BELL provided the evaluation team with the attendance records of students in the study during summer 2012, including any students in the non-BELL group who may have attended the program.

(3) Fall reading and math tests: Students in the study were encouraged to take standardized tests in math and reading in fall 2012. In the average study district, students took the tests six weeks after the end of the program, or one week after the start of the school year. Students’ reading achievement was assessed using the Group Reading Assessment and Diagnostic Examination (GRADE), and their math achievement was assessed with its math counterpart, the Group Mathematics Assessment and Diagnostic Examination (GMADE). The GRADE contains two subtests (reading comprehension and vocabulary), and the GMADE contains three (concepts, operations, and processes).

(4) Fall student survey: In the same session as the GRADE and GMADE were administered, students also completed a short survey asking about the extent to which they were engaged in various aspects of instruction when they returned to school in the fall (for example, whether they paid attention in class and whether they completed their homework on time). The survey also included a set of items asking students to describe their activities during the summer.

(5) BELL teacher survey: BELL administers a survey to its teachers as part of regular program monitoring and evaluation activities. The survey captures teachers’ characteristics as well as their perceptions of various aspects of the BELL program (such as training, materials, and staffing), of their own performance in the classroom, and of their students’ performance and engagement. BELL administers the survey to all of its teachers – academic (English Language Arts [ELA] or math or both) and enrichment teachers – as well as mentors (teaching assistants). However, given the academic focus of this evaluation, the target population for the study’s purposes was academic teachers who taught students in the study.

This collection contains two datasets. Part 1 is a student-level dataset that includes all information collected about students in the study sample (baseline data, GRADE and GMADE test scores, student survey data, and attendance data). Part 2 is a teacher survey dataset that includes teachers in the analysis sample (i.e. academic middle school teachers who responded to the survey and who taught students in the study).

Demographic information about the students include socioeconomic characteristics like racial or ethnic group, parents’ education, and so on. Demographic information about the teachers in the sample include their education and experience backgrounds.

Available at: https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/36531


 

 

 

Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency Project

The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project is the first major opportunity to use a behavioral economics lens to examine programs that serve poor and vulnerable families in the United States. Sponsored by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) of the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and led by MDRC, the project applies behavioral insights to issues related to the operations, implementation, and efficacy of social service programs and policies. The goal is to learn how tools from behavioral science can be used to deliver programs more effectively and, ultimately, improve the well-being of low-income children, adults, and families.

Available at: https://www.openicpsr.org/openicpsr/project/100389/version/V1/view;jsessionid=6D2A92F758D12586456511A7061EC417


 

 

 

Changing Attitudes and Motivation in Parolees (CHAMPS) Pilot Study in Dallas, Denver, and Des Moines, 2015-2016 (ICPSR 37091)

These data are part of NACJD’s Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

This study examined the implementation of a pilot parole-based intervention, known as the Next Generation of Parole Supervision (NG). Drs. Caleb Lloyd and Ralph Serin developed the NG model with funding from the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), and the National Institute of Corrections developed the NG curriculum for parole officers to implement. The Bureau of Justice Assistance funded the implementation of NG in three study sites: Dallas, Texas; Denver, Colorado; and Des Moines, Iowa.

This mixed-methods study focused on understanding how NG was implemented as it was piloted in the three sites, and assessed NG-trained parole officers’ fidelity to the NG model. In order to better understand NG’s implementation and the business as usual practices it was intended to replace, the study also included a second group of parole officers who were not trained in NG. The groups were not randomly assigned. Data collected for this study included interview data, parole officer questionnaires related to concepts of the NG curriculum, coaching logs providing measures of whether officers received coaching and its frequency, video recordings of parole supervision meetings, and parole caseload data.

Demographic variables included as part of this collection are parole officers’ age and sex, and site location. The data collection includes 3 SAS data files:

  • Parole officer-level data (archive_raf170831_po): Includes 31 cases and 26 variables.
  • Video-level data (archive_raf170831_video): Includes 241 cases and 15 variables.
  • Questionnaire-level data (archive_raf180719_tests): Includes 50 cases and 8 variables.

 

Available at: https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/37091


 

 

 

Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) Project, 2000-2007 (ICPSR 33181)

The ERA project was designed to fill the gap in knowledge about employment retention and advancement strategies that might be effective. Almost all ERA models targeted current or former recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). For the ERA study, over a dozen different program models were evaluated using random assignment of study participants to one or more program groups (eligible to receive ERA services or financial incentives) or to a control group (not eligible). Random assignment took place from 2000 to 2004 and involved over 45,000 individuals. This collection of Public Use Files includes seven data sets: four classified as core/final report sites and three from Hard-to-Employ study sites. Data sets include study participant characteristics data, administrative records covering two to four years of follow-up (on quarterly unemployment insurance [UI] earnings and employment, TANF, and SNAP/food stamps), and responses to surveys administered at 12 months and 42 months after random assignment. Data are included for all 16 sites (Chicago, Corpus Christi, Cleveland, Eugene, Fort Worth, Houston, Los Angeles EJC, Los Angeles RFS, Medford, Riverside Phase 2, Riverside PASS, Salem, South Carolina, Minnesota, New York City PRIDE, and New York City SACM). Data availability and length of follow-up vary by site. Data sets contain information on up to 40,197 study participants. These data were used in  How Effective Are Different Approaches Aiming to Increase Employment Retention and Advancement? Final Impacts for Twelve Models (MDRC, 2010); What Strategies Work for the Hard-to-Employ: Final Results of the Hard-to-Employ Demonstration and Evaluation Project and Selected Sites from the Employment Retention and Advancement Project (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families and Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, 2012); and other reports.

Available at: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/33181


 

 

 

Evaluation of Child Care Subsidy Strategies — Illinois Site, 2005-2008 (ICPSR 29001)

The Evaluation of Child Care Subsidy Strategies was a multisite, multiyear effort to determine whether and how different child care subsidy policies and procedures and quality improvement efforts helped low-income parents obtain and hold onto jobs and improve outcomes for children. The Illinois site evaluation was designed to test the impact of increased income eligibility and an extended eligibility redetermination period on child care and economic outcomes (such as type of care used, stability of child care arrangements, and parent’s employment and earnings). This study included 1,884 families who applied for child care subsidies in Cook County, Illinois, between March 2005 and May 2006. Under the state’s 2005 program rules, a family was eligible for subsidies if its income was below 50 percent of the state median income (SMI) for its family size, and this eligibility was redetermined for most families every 6 months. Families who qualified for the study were randomly assigned to one of two program groups: a 6-month redetermination group whose members were eligible for subsidies while their income remained below a higher level (65 percent) of SMI and who had to reapply for subsidies every 6 months; or a 12-month redetermination group whose members were eligible for subsidies with income up to a higher level (65 percent) of SMI and who had to reapply for subsidies every 12 months; or to a control group that received access to child care subsidies under existing rules. The final report analyzes program impacts in the two years after families entered the study. Public Use Files include five data sets. Data include participant characteristics, UI earnings, SNAP/food stamp, TANF, and child care subsidy benefits, and responses to a survey administered 12 months after random assignment. These data were used in The Effects of Child Care Subsidies for Moderate-Income Families in Cook County, Illinois (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, 2010).

Available at: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/29001


 

 

 

Evaluation of Child Care Subsidy Strategies — Washington Site, 2005-2007 (ICPSR 29002)

The Evaluation of Child Care Subsidy Strategies was a multisite, multiyear effort to determine whether and how different child care subsidy policies and procedures and quality improvement efforts helped low-income parents obtain and hold onto jobs and improve outcomes for children. The Washington site evaluation was designed to test the impact of changing parental copayment levels (the amount the parent paid) on various child care and economic outcomes (such as type of care used and parent’s employment and earnings). Under state rules in effect in 2005, families with incomes at or below 82 percent of the federal poverty threshold paid $15 per month for child care; families with incomes between 83 percent and 137.5 percent of the threshold paid $50 per month; and families with incomes between 137.5 percent and 200 percent of the threshold paid $50 plus 44 cents of each additional dollar of income above the 137.5 percent level. In the evaluation, study participants were randomly assigned to a program group whose members made copayments that were equal to or lower than standard amounts or to a control group whose members made copayments according to the standard rules. This study included 5,106 families who were approved to receive child care subsidies between October 18, 2005, and November 7, 2005. The final report analyzes program impacts in the two years after families entered the study. Public Use Files include two data sets. Data include participant characteristics, UI earnings, SNAP/food stamp, TANF, and child care subsidy benefits. These data were used in Effects of Reducing Child Care Subsidy Copayments in Washington State (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, 2010).

Available at: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/29002


 

 

 

Evaluation of Communities In Schools (CIS), North Carolina and Texas, 2011-2014 (ICPSR 37037)

Communities In Schools (CIS) works to provide and connect students with integrated support services to keep them on a path to graduation. The intent of the CIS model is to reduce dropout rates by integrating community and school-based support services within schools through the provision of “Level 1” and “Level 2” services. Level 1 services are broadly available to all students or to groups of students and are usually short-term, low intensity activities or services. CIS Coordinators spend much of their time focused on more intensive Level 2 “case-managed” services, which they provide to a subset of students displaying one or more significant risk factors, such as poor academic performance, a high absentee rate, or behavioral problems.

This study was a two-year randomized controlled trial of Level-2 CIS case management, which examined service provision, student experiences and student outcomes. This trial was half of a two-pronged national evaluation, the other half was a quasi-experimental study of the whole-school model. The study evaluated 24 mostly urban, low-income secondary schools in North Carolina and Texas during the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 school years; baseline data was also collected during the 2011-2012 school year. Data was collected through student surveys, school records, and CIS management information systems (MIS) data.

The data in this collection is student-level, including all information collected about students in the study sample with 613 variables and 4459 cases. The dataset includes three school years of data: baseline period (2011-2012), first year of implementation (2012-2013) and second year of implementation (2013-2014). Demographic variables in this collection include: free lunch status, special education status, employment, race, language, ethnicity, gender, household members, number of siblings, parents’ education level, and grade level.

Available at: https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/37037


 

 

 

Evaluation of Success for All PowerTeaching in Middle School Grades, United States, 2012-2016 (ICPSR 37046)

From 2012 through 2016, MDRC, a non-profit research organization, conducted an evaluation of the scale-up effort of Success for All PowerTeaching in middle-school math. PowerTeaching, a structured cooperative learning program, was designed to do just that. The study was funded by an Investing in Innovation (i3) fund from the U.S. Department of Education. The expansion of PowerTeaching through an i3 grant offers the education field a unique opportunity to learn what it takes to help teachers create cooperative learning environments in their classrooms.

The Success for All PowerTeaching scale-up evaluation examines the PowertTeaching implementation and how it impacts five school districts over a two-year period (the 2014-2015 school year through the 2015-2016 school year). It also considers the scale-up process itself - the methods employed and the extent to which the Success for All Foundation (SFAF), the organization that developed and provides technical assistance to schools operating the program, achieved its scale-up goals.

The ten data files included in this study contain a range of variable information gathered from student-level test scores, teacher and school principal surveys, school achievement snapshots, teacher logs, and scale-up initiative evaluations. Key variables include district IDs, teacher and principal IDs, baseline and outcome standardized test scores, structural and instructional processes, and records of teacher logs. Demographic variables for students include information on race, gender, special education, free/reduced lunch eligibility, ELL status, and age.

Available at: https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/37046


 

 

 

Impacts and Implementation of the i3-Funded Scale-Up of Success for All (ICPSR 36387)

The Impacts and Implementation of the i3-Funded Scale-Up of Success for All study examined the implementation and impacts of a whole-school reform model, Success for All (SFA), which seeks to increase reading proficiency among students in elementary schools serving low-income children, as this model was scaled up under an Investing in Innovation (i3) grant from the United States Department of Education. The impact evaluation used a cluster random assignment design in which 37 schools in five school districts were selected at random either to implement SFA (the program group schools) or to put in place their business-as-usual reading program (the control group schools). This collection contains Parts 1 to 7 for public use; and Part 8 for restricted use only.

In Part 1: Primary Student Sample data, children who began kindergarten in sampled schools and remained in them through second grade were assessed using standardized assessments of phonics skills, reading fluency, and comprehension. In Part 2: Auxiliary Sample, additional analyses examined third-year impacts on reading skills for all second graders, whether or not they remained continuously enrolled in the study schools, and for students in grades 3 through 5. The analysis also examined impacts for subgroups defined by ethnicity, early literacy skills measured upon entry into kindergarten, and other variables.

Part 3: School Achievement Snapshot Data contain implementation data for analysis using an instrument created by SFA’s developers that measures the extent to which program elements were put in place at each program group at the end of each year. This instrument was utilized to assess fidelity to the program model. The implementation analysis was also informed by principal (Part 5: Principal Survey) and teacher surveys (Part 4: Teacher Survey) in all schools, as well by logs (Part 6: Teacher Log) that asked teachers to document their instructional practices in early reading classes. These data, collected in all three study years, make it possible to measure implementation over the study period and to compare program group schools and control group schools on a variety of dimensions.

Part 7: Scale-Up Sample Data provided data on the schools that adopted SFA (and those which were approached, but did not adopt), and schools that adopted before the Investing in Innovations grant. Part 8 is the restricted version of Part 7, which retains geographic location variables.

Available at: https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/36387


 

 

 

Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ Demonstration and Evaluation Project: Rhode Island, Working toward Wellness, 2004-2009 (ICPSR 33782)

The Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ (HtE) Demonstration and Evaluation Project was a 10-year study conducted by MDRC that evaluated strategies aimed at improving employment and other outcomes for groups who face serious barriers to employment. Rhode Island’s “Working toward Wellness” (WtW) program was a one-year program that provided telephonic care management to depressed parents receiving Medicaid. From 2004 to 2006, 499 parents who met eligibility criteria and volunteered to participate in the study were randomly assigned either to a program group (N = 245) whose members were eligible to receive telephonic care management and other mental health services or to a control group (N = 254) whose members were referred to mental health treatment providers in their community. A single Public Use File includes responses to a baseline survey and responses to the surveys administered at 6, 18, and 36 months following random assignment. Surveys covered respondents’ general health, depression and treatments, substance abuse, work performance and attendance, wages, and income. These data were used in What Strategies Work for the Hard-to-Employ: Final Results of the Hard-to-Employ Demonstration and Evaluation Project and Selected Sites from the Employment Retention and Advancement Project (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, 2012); Working toward Wellness: Telephone Care Management for Medicaid Recipients with Depression, Eighteen Months After Random Assignment (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, 2010); and other reports.

Available at: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/33782


 

 

 

Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ, Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO), New York City, 2004-2008 (ICPSR 33783)

The Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ (HtE) Demonstration and Evaluation Project was a 10-year study conducted by MDRC that evaluated strategies aimed at improving employment and other outcomes for groups who face serious barriers to employment. New York City’s Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) program offered transitional jobs and other services to former prisoners. From January 2004 to October 2005, 977 former prisoners who volunteered to participate in the study were randomly assigned either to a program group (N = 568) that was eligible to receive all CEO’s services or to a control group (N = 409) that was eligible to receive limited preemployment and job search assistance and other services in their community. A single Public Use File includes information from multiple sources: demographic data collected at the time of random assignment, state and local criminal justice records, UI earnings records, program participation data, and a survey administered 18 months following random assignment. The survey included questions on use of services, employment, housing, drug treatment, family relationships, and other issues. These data were used in What Strategies Work for the Hard-to-Employ: Final Results of the Hard-to-Employ Demonstration and Evaluation Project and Selected Sites from the Employment Retention and Advancement Project (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, 2012); More Than a Job: Final Results from the Evaluation of the Center for Employment Opportunities (CEO) Transitional Jobs Program (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, 2012); and other reports.

LINK: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/33783


 

 

 

Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ Demonstration and Evaluation Project, Philadelphia, 2004-2010 (ICPSR 33784)

The Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ (HtE) Demonstration and Evaluation Project was a 10-year study conducted by MDRC that evaluated strategies aimed at improving employment and other outcomes for groups who face serious barriers to employment. The study in Philadelphia tested two employment strategies that were targeted to TANF recipients who had received assistance for at least 12 months since 1997 or who did not have a high school diploma or GED certificate and were not currently employed or participating in work activities. The first employment strategy was a paid transitional employment program that combined temporary, subsidized employment with work-related assistance. The second employment strategy focused on assessing and treating employment barriers before participants obtained a job. Between October 2004 and May 2006 a total of 1,942 TANF recipients who met eligibility criteria were randomly assigned to one of the two employment strategy (program) groups (N = 731 and N = 725) or to a control group (N = 486) whose members were encouraged to participate in other work or education activities. A single Public Use File includes demographic information, data on program participation, TANF and SNAP/food stamp benefit receipt, and responses to surveys conducted at 15 and 36 months after random assignment. Surveys covered participation in employment-related services, receipt of supportive services, health status, duration of TANF receipt, and employment history. These data were used in What Strategies Work for the Hard-to-Employ: Final Results of the Hard-to-Employ Demonstration and Evaluation Project and Selected Sites from the Employment Retention and Advancement Project (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, 2012); Alternative Employment Strategies for Hard-to-Employ TANF Recipients: Final Results from a Test of Transitional Jobs and Preemployment Services in Philadelphia (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, 2011); and other reports.

LINK: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/33784


 

 

 

Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ Demonstration and Evaluation Project: Kansas and Missouri, Enhanced Early Head Start, 2004-2010 (ICPSR 33801)

The Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ (HtE) Demonstration and Evaluation Project was a 10-year study conducted by MDRC that evaluated strategies aimed at improving employment and other outcomes for groups who face serious barriers to employment. The Enhanced Early Head Start (EHS) program, as operated by two organizations in several counties in Kansas and Missouri, was designed to address the developmental needs of young children living in poverty by offering enhanced services aimed at proactively addressing the employment and educational needs of their parents. This program included the addition of on-site self-sufficiency specialists to work with program staff and families on topics such as formalized employment, self-sufficiency services, and community partnerships with local employment-focused and educational agencies. Between August 2004 and December 2006, 610 low-income pregnant women and other new low-income applicants for Enhanced Head Start services who volunteered to participate in the study were randomly assigned either to a program group (N = 305) that was eligible to receive all enhanced services or to a control group (N = 305) that could receive other services in their community. A single Public Use File contains demographic information and responses to surveys conducted at 18 and 42 months after random assignment. Surveys covered receipt of EHS services and assistance programs, use of child care, TANF history, parenting, child behavior, child social-emotional skills, and child reading and math skills. These data were used in What Strategies Work for the Hard-to-Employ: Final Results of the Hard-to-Employ Demonstration and Evaluation Project and Selected Sites from the Employment Retention and Advancement Project (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, 2012); Enhanced Early Head Start with Employment Services: 42-Month Impacts from the Kansas and Missouri Sites of the Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ Demonstration and Evaluation Project (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, 2012); and other reports.

LINK: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/33801


 

 

 

Head Start CARES Demonstration: National Evaluation of Three Approaches to Improving Preschoolers’ Social and Emotional Competence, 2009-2011 [Restricted Use] (ICPSR 35510) Low-income preschool children experience greater risks to their social and emotional development than their more affluent peers. These gaps are observed before children begin their formal schooling, and they remain or increase during the elementary school years. Since social and emotional risks may compromise children’s future mental health and peer relationships, addressing them is important in its own right. In addition, social-emotional competence may aid learning: children who have diff… (more info)

The Head Start CARES (Classroom-based Approaches and Resources for Emotion and Social skill promotion) demonstration tested three distinct approaches to enhancing children’s social-emotional development on a large scale within the Head Start system, the largest federally funded early-childhood education program in the United States:  The Incredible Years Teacher Training Program focuses on teachers’ management of the classroom and of children’s behavior; Preschool PATHS uses structured lessons to help children learn about emotions and interact with peers appropriately; and a shortened-duration version of Tools of the Mind–Play promotes children’s learning through structured “make-believe” play. A comprehensive professional development package (including teacher training, ongoing coaching, and related technical assistance) supported delivery of these enhancements. The Head Start CARES demonstration was conducted over one selected school year during 2009-2011.  The study involved 17 Head Start grantees that varied by organizational setting, geographic location, urban/rural status, size, and racial or ethnic composition.  Within each grantee, groups of 4 or 8 centers with similar characteristics were randomly assigned to one of the three enhancements or to a control group that conducted business as usual.  The preschool sample included 307 classrooms and 3,603 children (2,670 four-year-old children and 933 three-year-old children). The study followed 2,599 of the four-year-old children into kindergarten for further data collection.  Outcomes and program effects were calculated for teachers, classrooms, and children.  Datasets are available from each of these analyses and include:  baseline data on teachers, teacher coaches, and classes; classroom assessment scores from external observers; teacher self-surveys; teacher reports on individual children, direct child assessments, and parent surveys; data extracted from the Head Start CARES management information system on teacher training activities and teachers’ and coaches’ views of the enhancements; and audiotape transcripts of coach-teacher meetings. Data from these sources were used in Impact Findings from the Head Start CARES Demonstration: National Evaluation of Three Approaches to Improving Preschoolers’ Social and Emotional Competence, OPRE Report 2014-44 (Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 2014) and other reports. All data and documentation files are restricted-use. Any user of this data must have IRB approval. Data are to be disseminated according to the ICPSR restricted-use policies and protocol.

LINK: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/35510


 

 

 

National Supported Work Evaluation Study, 1975-1979: Public Use Files (ICPSR 7865)

The National Supported Work Demonstration project was a transitional, subsidized work experience program for four target groups of people with longstanding employment problems: ex-offenders, former drug addicts, women who were long-term recipients of welfare benefits, and school dropouts, many with criminal records. The program provided up to 12 to 18 months of employment to about 10,000 individuals at 15 locations across the country for four years. In 10 of these sites — Atlanta, Chicago, Hartford, Jersey City, Newark, New York, Philadelphia, Oakland, San Francisco, and Wisconsin — 6,600 eligible applicants were randomly assigned either to experimental groups (offered a job in supported work) or to control groups, and an evaluation was conducted on the effects of the Supported Work program. Random assignment took place from April 1975 to July 1977. The follow-up period ended in 1979. Public Use File data include responses from the baseline interview, follow-up surveys conducted at 9, 18, 27, and 36 months following study participants’ date of random assignment, and an additional interview of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) recipients. Baseline data include information on study participants’ age, sex, race, marital status, education, number of children, employment history, job search, job training, mobility, household income, welfare assistance, housing, military discharge status, and drug use. Data from follow-up surveys include information on experimental group members’ experiences in supported work jobs and (for both research groups) participation in education and training activities, employment and earnings, receipt of public assistance, marital status and household composition, income, drug use, and criminal behavior. AFDC recipients were further asked about children in school and welfare participation. Data from these sources were used in Summary and Findings of the National Supported Work Demonstration (MDRC, 1980), separate impact reports on the four target groups, and other reports.

LINK: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/7865


 

 

 

New Hope Project: Income and Employment Effects on Children and Families, 1994-2003 [Restricted Use] (ICPSR 30282)

The New Hope Project tested the effects of offering multiple services and benefits to low-income adults who were willing and able to work at least 30 hours per week. The program was implemented in two inner-city areas in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, from 1994 to 1998. New Hope program participants were eligible to receive job search assistance, referrals to wage-paying community service jobs, a monthly earnings supplement, and subsidized child care and health insurance. The study of New Hope’s effects involved random assignment of 1,357 voluntary study enrollees to either the New Hope program group, eligible to receive the program’s benefits and services for three years, or a control group, not eligible to receive program benefits and services. The New Hope Project included a Child and Family Study (CFS) that involved a subsample of 745 study participants who had at least one child between the ages of 1 and 10 at their time of random assignment. Both studies estimated program effects over an eight-year follow-up period. Data available in this collection include (1) sample member characteristics collected at the time of random assignment from a baseline information form and voluntary private opinion survey; (2) New Hope program services data recorded in the program’s management information system; (3) statewide administrative data on employment and earnings, receipt of welfare and food stamp benefits, and the state Earned Income Tax Credit; (4) responses to surveys administered to parents and children at two, five, and eight years after study participants’ date of random assignment (concerning use of program services, receipt of New Hope benefits, parents’ employment and earnings, family functioning, parent-child relations, child-care use, and children’s well-being, behavior, and school performance); and (5) responses to a teacher survey about children’s school performance and social behavior. These data were used in New Hope for the Working Poor: Effects After Eight Years for Families and Children (MDRC, 2008); New Hope for Families and Children: Five-Year Results of a Program to Reduce Poverty and Reform Welfare (MDRC, 2003); and other reports.

NOTE: All data and documentation files are restricted use. Any user of this data must have IRB approval. Data are to be disseminated according to the ICPSR restricted-use policies and protocol.

LINK: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/30282


 

 

 

Project Redirection

Three years of data are available from this pilot program designed to help disadvantaged pregnant teenagers and teenage mothers achieve economic self-sufficiency. For inquiries regarding these data, please contact:

Sociometrics Corporation
170 State Street, Suite 260
Los Altos, CA 94022-2812

TEL: (650) 949-3282
FAX: (650) 949-3299

[email protected]


 

 

 

The Supporting Healthy Marriage Evaluation, 2003-2014 [Restricted Use] (ICPSR 34420)

The Supporting Healthy Marriage (SHM) program was a voluntary yearlong marriage education program for low-income married couples who had children or were expecting a child. Eight local programs offered SHM to couples within ten geographically diverse locations throughout the United States. The program provided a series of group workshops based on structured curricula designed to enhance couples’ relationships; supplemental activities to build on workshop themes; and family support services to address participation barriers, connect families with other services, and reinforce curricular themes. The SHM evaluation was launched in 2003 to study the implementation of the program and to test its effectiveness in strengthening low-income couples’ marriages, supporting stable and nurturing family environments, and improving parents’ and children’s well-being. The study sample consists of 6,298 couples (12,596 adult sample members) who were expecting or had a child under 18 years old. For each couple, one focal child (who ranged from prebirth to 14 years old) was selected as the target of all child-focused measures gathered in the data collection activities. The study randomly assigned couples to a program group eligible to attend the SHM marriage education program or a control group not eligible to attend. The collection of Restricted Access Files consists of 16 data sets and accompanying documentation: baseline data, a 12-month adult survey, five data sets of program participation data from the programs’ management information systems, three data sets of coded data from an observational study conducted at the 12-month follow-up point, a 30-month adult survey, a 30-month youth survey, data from a set of direct child assessments conducted at the 30-month follow-up point, a file containing the 30-month outcome measures, a longitudinal file of child and household composition data, and finally a version of the baseline data that conforms to MDRC’s standardized baseline data protocols. These data were used in A Family-Strengthening Program for Low-Income Families: Final Impacts from the Supporting Healthy Marriage Evaluation. OPRE Report 2014-09A. (Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, 2014); and other reports.

NOTE: All data and documentation files are restricted use. Any user of this data must have IRB approval. Data are to be disseminated according to the ICPSR restricted-use policies and protocol.

LINK: http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/ICPSR/studies/34420


 

 

 

Lessons in Evaluation of the Content Literacy Continuum: Report on Program Impacts, Program Fidelity, and Contrast (NCEE 2013-4001)
This study examines impacts of the Content Literacy Continuum (CLC) on high school students’ reading comprehension and accumulation of credits in core subject areas. The Content Literacy Continuum (CLC) combines whole-school and targeted approaches to supporting student literacy and content learning, using instructional routines and learning strategies developed by the University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning. The study used a randomized design and involved 33 high schools in nine school districts within four Midwestern states. Full implementation of this intervention began in the 2008-09 school year and continued through the 2009-10 school year. The study found no statistically significant impacts of CLC on reading comprehension or accumulation of core credits. The restricted-use file contains school records data for a sample of 7,365 grade 9 students from year 1; in year 2, the sample includes 7,951 grade 9 students and 8,514 grade 10 students. These data were used in  Evaluation of the Content Literacy Continuum: Report on Program Impacts, Program Fidelity, and Contrast, NCEE 2013-4001 (Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, 2012).  All data and documentation files are restricted-use. Data are to be disseminated according to the NCES restricted-use policies and protocol.

LINK: http://ies.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=NCEE20124033

 


 

 

 

Middle School Mathematics Professional Development Impact Study: Findings After the First Year of Implementation (NCEE 2010-4010)

This study examines the impact of intensive mathematics professional development (PD) on teachers’ knowledge and teaching skills for seventh-grade mathematics in rational numbers topics, such as fractions, decimals, percent, ratio, and proportion. The intensive PD studied includes over 100 hours of support in the form of summer institutes, seminars, and in-school coaching. Schools in 12 districts participating in the study were randomly assigned to receive the intensive PD activities or only the PD activities normally provided by the district. All seventh-grade teachers who taught at least one regular seventh-grade mathematics class within the treatment schools were offered the intensive PD during the first year of implementation. The program was implemented as intended but did not produce a statistically significant impact on teacher knowledge or student achievement during the first year. The program did have a statistically significant impact on the frequency teachers engaged in activities that elicited students’ thinking, one of three measures of instructional practice.  The restricted use file contains data for the 2007-08 school year including teacher mathematics knowledge test information, teacher surveys, classroom observations of teacher practices, student demographic data, and math achievement data for seventh graders. These data were used in  Middle School Mathematics Professional Development Impact Study: Findings After the First Year of Implementation, NCEE 2010-4009 ( Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, 2010). All data and documentation files are restricted-use. Data are to be disseminated according to the NCES restricted-use policies and protocol.

LINK: http://ies.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=NCEE20104010

 


 

 

 

The Evaluation of Enhanced Academic Instruction in After-School Programs: Final Report (NCEE 2009-4078)

This report includes two parallel impact studies, a math program study (“Mathletics,” developed by Harcourt School Publishers) and a reading program study (“Adventure Island,” developed by the Success for All Foundation) in which students attending an afterschool program are assigned by lottery to either receive the structured academic programming or the after-school programming regularly offered. For each academic program, the evaluation design allows for information about the one-year impact in the first and second years of operation as well as the two-year impact in which the program was offered to students for two consecutive years. Data on after-school staff characteristics, program implementation, and student outcomes were collected in the first and second years in 27 centers (12 providing the reading program and 15 providing the math program). After two years of implementation, the enhanced math model, Mathletics, had the following findings: one year of enhanced instruction produced positive and, for the first year, statistically significant impacts on student achievement, representing 10 percent more growth over the school year for students in the enhanced program group, as measured by SAT 10 total math scores.  Two years of the enhanced program produced no additional achievement benefit. Adventure Island, the reading model, had the following findings: after one year, the students in the enhanced reading program did not experience a statistically significant impact on their academic performance in reading , as measured by the SAT 10 total reading test or the DIBELS fluency test . Two years of participation produced significantly fewer gains in reading achievement for students in the enhanced program group. The restricted-use file contains data from this study for the 2005-06 and 2006-07 school years including school/after-school program characteristics data, program implementation information, after-school staff surveys, student demographic data, and math achievement scores for elementary school after-school participants. These data were used in The Evaluation of Enhanced Academic Instruction in After-School Programs: Final Report, NCEE 2009-4077 ( Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, 2009). All data and documentation files are restricted-use. Data are to be disseminated according to the NCES restricted-use policies and protocol.

LINK: http://ies.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=NCEE20094078

 


 

 

 

Reading First Impact Study (NCEE 2009-4039)

The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001 created the Reading First program to help ensure that all students can read at or above grade level by the end of third grade. The law required an independent, rigorous evaluation of the program. The Reading First Impact Study is an assessment of the federal funding stream and whether that funding and the accompanying parameters for its use changed teachers’ classroom instructional practice and improved students’ reading achievement. It compares a group of 125 schools that were selected to receive a Reading First funding grant with a group of 123 schools from the same sites that did not receive a grant. Reading First schools in the study sample received their grant awards between April 2003 and August 2004. The average grant across the study sites was $409 per pupil and ranged from $173 to $856 per pupil. The 248 study schools come from 17 school districts and one state-wide Reading First program. The Reading First Impact Study employs regression discontinuity designs in 17 of the study sites and a randomized experiment in one site. The Reading First Impact Study Final Report provides an update of previously released impact findings on student reading comprehension and classroom reading instruction using an additional year of data (2006-07). In addition, the report includes information on the impact of the program on first grade students’ decoding skills in 2006-07 as well as an examination of the relationship between classroom instruction and student reading comprehension. The results indicate that Reading First produced statistically significant positive impacts on multiple reading practices promoted by the program, such as the amount of instructional time spent on the five essential components of reading instruction and professional development in scientifically-based reading instruction. Reading First did not produce a statistically significant impact on student reading comprehension test scores in grades one, two or three. However, there was a positive and statistically significant impact on first grade students’ decoding skills in the spring 2007. The restricted-use data file for this study contains data for the 2004-05, 2005-06, and 2006-07 school years. Data include demographics and other characteristics of schools; principal, reading coach, and teacher surveys of how scientifically based reading instruction was implemented; aspects of reading instruction from classroom observations; student demographics and reading comprehension achievement for first through third graders; and assessments of decoding skills for first graders in spring 2007.  These data were used in Reading First Impact Study Final Report, NCEE 2009-4038 (Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, 2008).  .All data and documentation files are restricted-use. Data are to be disseminated according to the NCES restricted-use policies and protocol.

LINK: http://ies.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=NCEE20094039


 

 

 

Reading First Impact Study: Interim Report (NCEE 2008-4017)

The No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001 created the Reading First program to help ensure that all students can read at or above grade level by the end of third grade. The law required an independent, rigorous evaluation of the program. The Reading First Impact Study is an assessment of the federal funding stream and whether that funding and the accompanying parameters for its use changed teachers’ classroom instructional practice and improved students’ reading achievement. It compares a group of 125 schools that were selected to receive a Reading First funding grant with a group of 123 schools from the same sites that did not receive a grant. Reading First schools in the study sample received their grant awards between April 2003 and August 2004. The average grant across the study sites was $409 per pupil and ranged from $173 to $856 per pupil. The 248 study schools come from 17 school districts and one state-wide Reading First program. The Reading First Impact Study employs regression discontinuity designs in 17 of the study sites and a randomized experiment in one site. Key findings from the interim report include: on average, Reading First increased the amount of time that teachers spent on the five essential components of reading instruction promoted by the program; on average, Reading First did not improve students’ reading comprehension test scores; the impacts of Reading First on teachers’ instructional practice and students’ reading achievement are consistently positive for late award sites and mixed for early award sites, and it is not possible to determine what characteristics of early award sites and late award sites may have caused observed differences in Reading First impacts. The restricted-use data file for this report contains data from this study for the 2004-05 and 2005-06 school years. Data includes demographics and other characteristics of schools, aspects of reading instruction from classroom observations,  student demographics, and student reading comprehension achievement for first through third graders. These data were used in Reading First Impact Study: Interim Report, NCEE 2008-4016 (Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, 2008). All data and documentation files are restricted-use. Data are to be disseminated according to the NCES restricted-use policies and protocol.

LINK: http://ies.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=NCEE20094039


 

 

 

National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies (NEWWS)

NEWWS examined the long-term effects on welfare recipients and their children of 11 mandatory welfare-to-work programs, operated in seven sites during the 1990s: Atlanta, Georgia; Columbus, Ohio; Detroit and Grand Rapids, Michigan; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Portland, Oregon; and Riverside, California. Under study were two primary preemployment approaches — one that emphasized short-term job search assistance and encouraged people to find jobs quickly and one that emphasized longer-term skill-building activities (primarily basic education) before entering the labor market — and a third approach that mixed elements of the other two. The effects of the NEWWS programs were estimated for parents and children in over 44,000 single-parent families using a randomized control trial.  Between 1991 and 1994, single-parent welfare recipients were randomly assigned to a program group (to one of two program groups in four sites), which received employment preparation services and were subject to mandatory participation requirements, or to a control group without services or mandates.  Study participants and their children were tracked over a five-year follow-up period, which, depending on the site, spanned different parts of the 1990s, through 1999.  Datasets contain information on up to 44,569 study participants and 3,018 “focal” children (one per study participant), age 3 to 5 at the date of random assignment.  Baseline data included study participant characteristics, scores on literacy and math tests, and responses to a Private Opinion Survey.  Data on program outcomes and effects included  administrative records (quarterly Unemployment Insurance (UI) earnings and employment, TANF, and SNAP/food stamps); responses to surveys administered to adult study participants at 2 years after random assignment (in all sites) and 5 years after random assignment (in four sites); and  responses and assessment scores from  Child Outcomes Study (COS) surveys administered in three sites at two years and five years after random assignment.  The Five-Year COS dataset also includes responses to a teacher survey for 1,472 focal children.   These data were used in Moving People from Welfare-to-Work: Lessons from the National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies (Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families and Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation; and U.S. Department of Education„ 2002);  National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies: How Effective Are Different Welfare-to-Work Approaches?  Five-Year Adult and Child Impacts for Eleven Programs (Washington, DC:  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families and Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation; and U.S. Department of Education, 2001); and other reports.  A copy of the original data used in the evaluation is available to researchers (on a restricted access basis) at NCHS.  Contact NCHS for more information.


 

 

 

Welfare Leavers in Cuyahoga County, Ohio and Los Angeles County, California

The Welfare Leavers’ studies in Cuyahoga County (which includes the city of Cleveland) and Los Angeles County supplement MDRC’s evaluation of the Project on Devolution and Urban Change, which analyzed the experiences of welfare recipients in Cuyahoga County (Cleveland), Ohio; Dade County (Miami), Florida; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Los Angeles, California..  (See http://www.mdrc.org/available-public-use-files  for descriptions of two Public Use Files of survey responses from the Urban Change evaluation that are available from MDRC.)  They were also part of a larger study of TANF leavers in nearly 20 states and localities that was funded and managed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE).  The two MDRC studies compare the patterns of employment, receipt of public assistance, income, and material well-being for welfare recipients who left assistance shortly before implementation of federal welfare legislation with patterns for recipients who left assistance sometime after implementation.  Research cohorts were drawn from the third calendar quarters of 1996 and 1998 (N=6,151 in Cuyahoga County and 27,146 in Los Angeles County).  The project included analysis of ten years of full population administrative data developed for the Urban Change project, as well as a small mixed-mode sample survey drawn from a cohort surveyed between July and December 1999.  Available data include TANF, SNAP/food stamp, and Medicaid eligibility records; quarterly Unemployment Insurance (UI) earnings and employment records; and survey responses.  These data were used in Monitoring Outcomes for Cuyahoga County’s Welfare Leavers: How Are They Faring? (New York: MDRC, 2001); and Monitoring Outcomes for Los Angeles County’s Pre- and Post-CalWORKs Leavers: How Are They Faring? (New York: MDRC, 2003).