Behavioral Interventions

Lessons from the BIAS Project

November, 2017

In child support programs, parents must often make complicated decisions with little information in a highly emotional context. The BIAS project, which applied behavioral insights to human services programs, worked with three states to design eight tests focusing on child support order modifications and collection of payments.

November, 2017
Crystal Hall

Researchers developing behavioral interventions begin by defining a problem, identifying “bottlenecks” that might hamper desired outcomes, and designing and testing possible solutions. In this Expert Commentary from the final report on the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project, Crystal Hall suggests three ideas for expanding the use of this process.

October, 2017
Sheldon Danziger

In this commentary from the final report on the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project, Sheldon Danziger talks about the value of incorporating insights from behavioral science into new system-level interventions when developing policies to help low-income populations.

 

September, 2017

Encouraging Additional Summer Enrollment (EASE) aims to increase summer enrollment rates among low-income community college students using insights from behavioral science. This infographic describes some of the benefits of summer enrollment, reasons why students may not enroll in summer, and interventions the EASE team designed to address low enrollment rates.

Building a School Choice Architecture

June, 2017

As school choice systems expand, district enrollment offices are striving to make the choice process accessible and clear for families. This practitioner brief offers lessons for supporting families through the sequence of decisions involved as they engage in the process, search for information, and compare and select schools.

Final Report of the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) Project

May, 2017
Lashawn Richburg-Hayes, Caitlin Anzelone, Nadine Dechausay

The BIAS project tested behavioral interventions in child support, child care, and work support programs with nearly 100,000 low-income clients in eight human services agencies. Each site saw at least one significant, low-cost impact. The findings suggest that small environmental changes can enhance client-agency interactions and expanded behavioral strategies might help strengthen programs and policies.

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