Case Management

Report

Telephone Care Management for Medicaid Recipients with Depression, Thirty-Six Months After Random Assignment

December, 2011
Sue Kim, Allen J. LeBlanc, Pamela Morris, Greg Simon, Johanna Walter

A telephonic care management program increased the use of mental health services by Medicaid recipients with depression while the program was running, but it did not help individuals sustain treatment after the intervention ended. The program did not reduce depression on average, nor did it have any effect on employment outcomes.

Report

Telephone Care Management for Medicaid Recipients with Depression, Eighteen Months After Random Assignment

November, 2010
Sue Kim, Allen J. LeBlanc, Pamela Morris, Greg Simon, Johanna Walter

A telephonic care management program increased the use of mental health services by Medicaid recipients with depression, although that effect faded over time. The program did not reduce depression on average, but it did reduce the number of people who suffered from very severe depression.

Report

Early Results from a Telephone Care Management Program for Medicaid Recipients with Depression

August, 2009
Sue Kim, Allen J. LeBlanc, Charles Michalopoulos

Very early results from a random assignment study suggest that Working toward Wellness increased the use of mental health services and had mixed effects on depression severity. Impacts are concentrated among Hispanic participants.

Issue Focus

Will the Past Be Prologue?

November, 2009
Gordon Berlin

In remarks given at a conference sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration, MDRC President Gordon Berlin looks at the extraordinary challenges the current labor market presents to employment policy generally and WIA reauthorization specifically, outlines what we have (and haven’t) learned from research, and makes recommendations for future directions.

Report

A Synthesis of Research

February, 2009
David H. Greenberg, Victoria Deitch, Gayle Hamilton

Most welfare programs seek to ensure that poor families have adequate income while at the same time encouraging self-sufficiency. Based on studies of 28 programs involving more than 100,000 sample members, this synthesis compares the costs, benefits, and returns on investment of six welfare program strategies – from the perspectives of participants, government budgets, and society as a whole.

Report

Sustaining a Vision of Welfare Reform Based on Personal Change, Work Preparation, and Employer Involvement

March, 1998
Susan Gooden
Report

Six-Year Impacts on Parents and Children from the Minnesota Family Investment Program

July, 2005
Lisa Gennetian, Cynthia Miller, Jared Smith

While positive effects on most parents’ earnings and income faded after six years, young children in some of the most disadvantaged families were still performing better in school than their counterparts in a control group. And, for the most disadvantaged parents, MFIP seems to have created a lasting “leg up” in the labor market.

Pages