Counseling/Advising

Report

Findings and Lessons from First Things First

July, 2005
Janet Quint, Howard Bloom, Alison Rebeck Black, LaFleur Stephens

First Things First, a comprehensive school reform initiative, increased student achievement in Kansas City, Kansas, the first school district to adopt the reform model. It is not yet clear if First Things First is working in four other school districts in which it has been replicated.

Report

Final Lessons from Parents’ Fair Share

November, 2001

Fathers provide important financial and emotional support to their children. Yet low-income noncustodial fathers, with low wages and high rates of joblessness, often do not fulfill their parenting roles. The child support system has not traditionally helped these men to do so, since its focus has been on securing financial support from fathers who can afford to pay.

Report

Men of Color Discuss Their Experiences in Community College

March, 2010
Alissa Gardenhire, Herbert Collado, Kasey Martin, Alma Castro

This report takes an in-depth look at the perceptions and experiences of 87 African-American, Hispanic, and Native American men who were enrolled in developmental math courses at four community colleges. The study explores how the students’ experiences in their high schools and communities, as well as their identities as men of color, influenced their decision to go to college and their engagement in school.

Report

Resources for Program Operators from the Supporting Healthy Marriage Demonstration and Evaluation

May, 2011

Developed for sites participating in a federal demonstration and evaluation of relationship and marriage skills programs for low-income married couples, this toolkit offers practical guidance about program design, management, and marketing, among other topics. It may be particularly useful for voluntary programs focusing on family relationships, couples, or fatherhood.

Report

An Exploratory Focus Group Study

February, 2003
Laura Nelson, Rogéair Purnell

The Opening Doors initiative is designed to help low-wage workers, at-risk youth, and recipients of Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) earn college credentials as the pathway to better jobs and higher earnings. Concentrating on a program implemented in California, this report supplements efforts from an earlier Opening Doors focus group study to gain insights from low-income students on the factors that affect their ability to enroll in school and earn a college credential while balancing work and parenting responsibilities.

Report

Services That May Help Low-Income Students Succeed in Community College

November, 2004
Rogéair Purnell, Susan Blank

Community colleges can pursue many strategies for enhancing student services, including offering “one-stop shopping,” which provides students with multiple services at the same time and place.

Report

An Exploratory Analysis

January, 2006
Theresa M. Akey

This analysis of data collected in MDRC’s evaluation of the First Things First reform initiative confirms that high school students’ engagement in school and perceptions of their own academic competence influence their mathematics achievement. The study also suggests that perceived academic competence may be more influential than engagement in boosting achievement in both mathematics and reading.

Report

The Effect of Project GRAD on High School Student Outcomes in Three Urban School Districts

July, 2006
Jason Snipes, Glee Ivory Holton, Fred Doolittle, Laura Sztejnberg

This report describes the effects of Project GRAD, an ambitious education reform that targets high schools and the elementary and middle schools that feed into them, on a variety of student outcomes in high schools in Houston, Texas; Atlanta, Georgia; and Columbus, Ohio.

Report

Early Findings from a Performance-Based Scholarship Program at the University of New Mexico

August, 2011
Cynthia Miller, Melissa Binder, Vanessa Harris, Kate Krause

Low-income freshmen received financial support if they enrolled full time, maintained a “C” average, and received enhanced academic advising. After one year, students attempted and earned more credits, received more financial aid dollars and in some cases reduced their loans, and registered for more credits in the third semester.

Report

Four-Year Findings from Chaffey College’s Opening Doors Program

November, 2011
Michael J. Weiss, Thomas Brock, Colleen Sommo, Timothy Rudd, Mary Clair Turner

This program included a “College Success” course and offered enhanced counseling. A change from optional to required services led to increased program participation, and the new program decreased the percentage on academic probation after the two program semesters. Nevertheless, after four years, the program had no discernible effect on academic outcomes.

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