GED Completion

Report

A Synthesis of Research

February, 2009
David H. Greenberg, Victoria Deitch, Gayle Hamilton

Most welfare programs seek to ensure that poor families have adequate income while at the same time encouraging self-sufficiency. Based on studies of 28 programs involving more than 100,000 sample members, this synthesis compares the costs, benefits, and returns on investment of six welfare program strategies – from the perspectives of participants, government budgets, and society as a whole.

Report

Three-Year Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation

June, 2011
Megan Millenky, Dan Bloom, Sara Muller-Ravett, Joseph Broadus

After three years, participants in National Guard Youth ChalleNGe, an intensive, “quasi-military” residential program for high school dropouts, are more likely than their control group counterparts to have obtained a GED or high school diploma, to have earned college credits, and to be working. Their earnings are also 20 percent higher.

Report

Early Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program Evaluation

February, 2009
Dan Bloom, Alissa Gardenhire, Conrad Mandsager

Very early results from a random assignment evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, an intensive, “quasi-military” residential program for high school dropouts, show that the program has large impacts on high school diploma and GED attainment and positive effects on working, college-going, health, self-efficacy, and avoiding arrest.

Report

Five-Year Impacts of Pre-Employment Services in the National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies

July, 2003

This report finds that — over a five-year follow-up period — both mandatory employment-focused and education-focused welfare-to-work programs helped young adults attain higher earnings.

Report

Final Report on a Comprehensive Program for Young Mothers in Poverty and Their Children

January, 1997
Janet Quint, Johannes Bos, Denise Polit
Report

Interim Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Evaluation

May, 2010
Megan Millenky, Dan Bloom, Colleen Dillon

Interim results from a random assignment evaluation of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, an intensive, residential program for high school dropouts, show that young people who had access to ChalleNGe were much more likely than those in the control group to have obtained a high school diploma or a General Educational Development certificate. They were also somewhat more likely to be working, in college, or enlisted in the military.

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