Telephonic Services

A Technical Supplement to “Behavioral Economics and Social Policy”

April, 2014
Lashawn Richburg-Hayes, Caitlin Anzelone, Nadine Dechausay, Saugato Datta, Alexandra Fiorillo, Louis Potok, Matthew Darling, John Balz

This technical supplement to an introductory report for the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project presents a description of behavioral interventions that have been commonly researched in studies.

August, 2014
Charles Michalopoulos, Michelle S. Manno, Tod Mijanovich, Susanna Ginsburg, Jennifer Somers

This program aimed to improve health care quality and reduce Medicaid costs for high-needs Medicaid recipients in New York by helping them use appropriate care that would reduce hospital admissions and emergency department visits. The program did not appear to reduce Medicaid costs or care from hospitals and emergency departments.

Designing Innovative Solutions for Programs Supported by the Administration for Children and Families

April, 2014
Lashawn Richburg-Hayes, Caitlin Anzelone, Nadine Dechausay, Saugato Datta, Alexandra Fiorillo, Louis Potok, Matthew Darling, John Balz

This report describes three sites in the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project, which applies tools from behavioral economics to improve the well-being of low-income individuals and families — the Texas Office of the Attorney General’s Child Support Division, the Illinois Department of Human Services, and the National Domestic Violence Hotline.

Managing Health Care for Medicaid Recipients with Disabilities

May, 2013

This program aimed to improve the quality of health care while reducing Medicaid costs by helping individuals use appropriate care that would reduce hospital admissions and emergency department visits. Like a similar pilot run by Colorado Access, which is described in a separate report, it had little effect on health care use.

Final Report on the Colorado Access Coordinated Care Pilot Program

April, 2013

This pilot program aimed to improve the quality of health care while reducing Medicaid costs by helping individuals use appropriate care that would reduce hospital admissions and emergency department visits. The program had little effect on health care use, but the report suggests several ways to improve its design.

June, 2012

Using an alternative to classical statistics, this paper reanalyzes results from three published studies of interventions to increase employment and reduce welfare dependency. The analysis formally incorporates prior beliefs about the interventions, characterizing the results in terms of the distribution of possible effects, and generally confirms the earlier published findings.

Telephone Care Management for Medicaid Recipients with Depression, Thirty-Six Months After Random Assignment

December, 2011
Sue Kim, Allen J. LeBlanc, Pamela Morris, Greg Simon, Johanna Walter

A telephonic care management program increased the use of mental health services by Medicaid recipients with depression while the program was running, but it did not help individuals sustain treatment after the intervention ended. The program did not reduce depression on average, nor did it have any effect on employment outcomes.

Telephone Care Management for Medicaid Recipients with Depression, Eighteen Months After Random Assignment

November, 2010
Sue Kim, Allen J. LeBlanc, Pamela Morris, Greg Simon, Johanna Walter

A telephonic care management program increased the use of mental health services by Medicaid recipients with depression, although that effect faded over time. The program did not reduce depression on average, but it did reduce the number of people who suffered from very severe depression.

Early Results from a Telephone Care Management Program for Medicaid Recipients with Depression

August, 2009
Sue Kim, Allen J. LeBlanc, Charles Michalopoulos

Very early results from a random assignment study suggest that Working toward Wellness increased the use of mental health services and had mixed effects on depression severity. Impacts are concentrated among Hispanic participants.

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