Mississippi

A Summary of Impact and Implementation Findings from Head Start CARES

April, 2015

This two-page issue focus summarizes the main findings from Head Start CARES, a test of three distinct classroom-based approaches to enhancing children’s social-emotional development: Incredible Years Teacher Training Program, Preschool PATHS (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies), and Tools of the Mind–Play.

Exploratory Findings from the Head Start CARES Demonstration

December, 2014
JoAnn Hsueh, Amy Lowenstein, Pamela Morris, Shira Kolnik Mattera, Michael Bangser

This report suggests that evidence-based approaches can improve 3-year-olds’ social-emotional competence in mixed-age preschool classrooms. While the findings are promising, further research is needed to confirm the results and to better understand how these benefits are generated.

National Evaluation of Three Approaches to Improving Preschoolers’ Social and Emotional Competence

June, 2014
Pamela Morris, Shira Kolnik Mattera, Nina Castells, Michael Bangser, Karen Bierman, Cybele Raver

This demonstration tested the effectiveness of three program enhancements implemented at scale that were designed to improve preschool children’s social-emotional competence. All three had positive impacts on teacher practice and on children’s social-emotional outcomes during the preschool year, although to varying degrees and not necessarily in the expected ways.

Large-Scale Implementation of Programs to Improve Children’s Social-Emotional Competence

December, 2013
Shira Kolnik Mattera, Chrishana M. Lloyd, Michael Fishman, Michael Bangser

This report describes the extent to which three different classroom-based social-emotional strategies and related professional development supports were implemented as intended in Head Start centers, as well as the degree to which teachers’ practices changed as a result.

March, 2010
John Martinez, Thomas Fraker, Michelle S. Manno, Peter Baird, Arif Mamun, Bonnie O'Day, Anu Rangarajan, David Wittenburg

The Youth Transition Demonstration, led by Mathematica Policy Research, MDRC, and TransCen, Inc., is developing and evaluating promising strategies to help youth with disabilities become as economically self-sufficient as possible as they transition from school to work. This report offers six overall implementation lessons to help policymakers and administrators develop, fund, and provide interventions for youth with disabilities.

December, 2008
John Martinez, Michelle S. Manno, Peter Baird, Thomas Fraker, Todd Honeycutt, Arif Mamun, Bonnie O'Day, Anu Rangarajan

The transition to adulthood for youth with disabilities, particularly youth receiving disability program benefits, can be especially challenging. The Youth Transition Demonstration, led by Mathematica Policy Research, MDRC, and TransCen, Inc., is developing and evaluating six promising strategies to help youth with disabilities become as economically self-sufficient as possible as they transition from school to work.

January, 2009
Anu Rangarajan, Thomas Fraker, Todd Honeycutt, Arif Mamun, John Martinez, Bonnie O'Day, David Wittenburg

The Youth Transition Demonstration (YTD), led by Mathematica Policy Research, MDRC, and TransCen, Inc., is developing and evaluating six promising strategies to help youth with disabilities become as economically self-sufficient as possible as they transition from school to work. This report presents a detailed, comprehensive design for the YTD evaluation.

February, 2011
Thomas Fraker, Alison Rebeck Black, Arif Mamun, Michelle S. Manno, John Martinez, Bonnie O'Day, Meghan O'Toole, Anu Rangarajan, Debbie Reed

The Youth Transition Demonstration, led by Mathematica Policy Research, MDRC, and TransCen, Inc., is developing and evaluating strategies to help youth with disabilities transition from school to work. While participants in the Erie County, NY, site were more likely to participate in self-sufficiency services, the program has had no impact on employment or school completion in its first year.

Findings and Lessons from First Things First

July, 2005
Janet Quint, Howard Bloom, Alison Rebeck Black, LaFleur Stephens

First Things First, a comprehensive school reform initiative, increased student achievement in Kansas City, Kansas, the first school district to adopt the reform model. It is not yet clear if First Things First is working in four other school districts in which it has been replicated.

Pages