MDRC Videos

11/2018

In this 30-second video, MDRC Senior Associate Donna Wharton-Fields describes how the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has invested in the replication of Jobs-Plus, a successful employment program for residents of public housing that MDRC helped develop and evaluated.

10/2018

In this 30-second video, MDRC Research Associate Barbara Condliffe references key points from our recent literature review on project-based learning, a concept in which a class project is the central vehicle of instruction in a K-12 setting.

09/2018

This video summarizes the findings from the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project, which tested 15 behavioral interventions in work support, child support, and child care programs in eight states, highlighting projects in Indiana, Los Angeles, and Texas.

06/2018

In this 30-second video, MDRC Senior Research Associate Crystal Byndloss introduces MDRC’s ongoing evaluation of an innovative model of career and technical education that prepares students for both college and careers. 

06/2018

In this five-minute video, MDRC’s Meghan McCormick and Jason Sachs from the Boston Public Schools describe an ongoing evaluation of Boston’s innovative early learning program that combines evidence-based curricula with coaching and professional development for teachers, reinforced by system-wide alignment of instruction from prekindergarten into elementary school, so that each grade seeks to build on the lessons and skills that children learned in the previous grade.

10/2016

This eight-minute video profiles the lives of six New Yorkers who are participating in the Paycheck Plus demonstration and evaluation of an expanded Earned Income Tax Credit for low-income single workers without dependent children.

02/2014

Much attention is being paid to low-income, college-ready students who are “undermatching” — enrolling in colleges for which they are academically overqualified or not going to college at all. A number of “light touch” informational interventions targeting the top 15 percent of standardized test-takers appear effective at getting these students to attend selective colleges.